Stocking up

Semi graphic photos.

One of the biggest goals for our homestead is to stop buying meat. Between the rabbits and chickens, we are getting closer! Last year, two of our hens raised clutches outside. Last weekend, I processed six birds for a total of 25 pounds. It wouldn’t have been possible to get through so many so quickly if not for the plucker I borrowed from a fellow homesteading friend!

What was most interesting this time is that we had never before butchered hens. I figured we would probably find eggs, but it was still very surprising!

One egg was completely formed, minus the shell. Had we waited a day, it probably would have been in the coop!

While this wasn’t the first time using the plucker, it was a somewhat new experience. I dislike the slaughter, but she hates it. And she doesn’t mind the butchering, but it’s uncomfortable for me because my hands are too big for the smaller birds. But she doesn’t like removing the lower legs and wing tips because of the force involved. And I don’t mind that. So we set up almost an assembly line. I took a bird from the freezer and removed the offending limbs, she gutted, and then I bagged.

This was also our first time using shrink bags. The overall look is much better than the gallon ziplocs!

The end result was a freezer with much more meat than had been there before. And since we want to serve chicken at the wedding, this is the way to do it!

Advertisements

Double Edged Sword

A year into raising meat rabbits in a colony setting, I’ve got a pretty good feel for the pros and cons, I think. I also feel like I’ve successfully tackled most of the cons.

First con, a colony pen is substantially more difficult to make escape proof than individual cages. We’ve both had to chase down rabbits more times than I care to admit. But when you’ve got an adventurer like Benjamin who thinks he is invisible, it’s not hard to find the weak spots. Stand there for a minute and he will show you.

Second con, any health issues spread much more easily when rabbits live together. We had a new rabbit introduce ear mites. Thankfully, there is a very easy and effective medication that is gentle on their system. Ivermectin is available at any veterinary office and most farm stores. The dosage is ridiculously low.

Third con, the rabbits will establish a hierarchy with some more dominant than others. This one is arguable. Many say that this causes additional stress on the rabbits. However, it is their natural social order. If a human child goes to school, they might have to deal with a bully. But if they never go outside, they’ll never develop into a functioning adult.

Fourth con, and this is probably the biggest one, it is harder to control breeding. At one point this last year, with three adult females, we had 27 rabbits total. That was tough. So for now, Benjamin is isolated from the rest, but his individual pen is inside the communal pen, which prevents him from feeling too alone.

But for all of that, I don’t think I’ll ever go to a cage style rabbitry. The pros are just too big.

First pro, the rabbits have more space. Having seen the rabbits run around in circles and get excited over new branches to gnaw or veggies scraps, it’s pretty obvious that rabbits like having room to play. And when it snows, they go wild. Backflips and rolling around. It’s adorable and entertaining!

Second pro, socialization. Rabbits are social animals. You’ll never find a wild rabbit living by itself. They always live in colonies, and always have company. To me, letting them have that in captivity matters. When it’s cold, they can huddle for warmth. When it’s nice out they groom and play with each other. I feel it makes for happier rabbits.

Third pro, ground beneath their feet. Sure, you can put cages directly on the ground, but that negates the easy cleaning that people use cages for in the first place. Our rabbits nibble grass and claw at dirt. They still have a wire fence barrier to prevent digging and escaping, but they at least get to feel grass beneath their feet any time they want.

Ultimately, it’s a personal choice. But we take these animals into our lives for our own uses, and we both feel that deserves the courtesy of the best life possible. Yesterday, I processed five rabbits for a total of 15 pounds of meat. It was a lot of work doing so many at a time, but we are now down to rabbits with names, one that is probably pregnant, and one that’s too small to process for a couple weeks. And that will cut down on the feed bill.

We would be family even if we weren’t related.

Happy holidays from Huckleberry Hills! The lady McFarmFace and I have shared a few christmases now, but this one is special. Because our little monkey butt gets to be here too.

Throughout the years I’ve heard lots of stories of family holiday horror. And I’ve come to realize that I live in a weird little hallmark card. I am extremely fortunate that my family gets along decently well, but so do our friends.

But folks, this is a choice. You will be surrounded by only those you choose to surround yourself with. If someone in your life is constantly negative, you have no obligation to keep them around. Whether it’s a neighbor, a cousin, an in-law, or even immediate family. You don’t owe anyone your own sanity!

So if you’ve got an uncle who gets drunk and picks fights, don’t invite him. If you’ve got a friend who is passive aggressive or constantly puts people down, that’s not a friend.

People like me homestead for a better quality of life. That starts at home.

Rant over! Soapbox put away.

As usual, my lovely fiancée absolutely killed it on dinner. This was our combination holiday and engagement party. We served roasted goose (raised here), mashed potatoes, figgy pudding, Turkish delights, cranberry brioche, and various appetizers. And wine. Lots of wine! Even more wine because my wonderful family brought more! We watched muppet Christmas carol and generally had a wonderful time.

One of these days, I’m going to remember to take a picture of one of our birds after cooking but before eating. I only got to the desserts!

My whole life, I have heard that many people don’t like goose because it’s greasy. Same with duck. In fact, for a long time I was one of those people. I would like to state, unequivocally for the record, that these people haven’t had a properly cooked goose or duck. This was a big goose, and half the guests were a little wary of goose. And we ran out of goose before anything else.

This post got away from me a little. It’s a bit rambling. But that’s ok. It’s the holidays.

Happy holidays from Huckleberry Hills!!

First goose!

Ok, I just spent several hours processing a goose. I’m sure the next time will be easier, but I am beat!

Even using the wax, this was quite the ordeal! Largely because of pot size. We have one pot large enough for scalding birds. It’s not large enough for a goose. And since waterfowl have all that down, you also need a pot for melting wax.

Long story short, I’m upgrading our kitchen before I butcher another goose! But eventually I’ll write more about the process. But for now, I have a vehicle speed sensor to replace and a wood stove to get up those stairs somehow! And then bed.

Thank goodness for homesteading friends!

People usually say what they’re thankful for last Thursday but I march to the beat of a different drum. Or orchestra, as my mother would tell you.

Of course I’m thankful for my family, especially our newest member, and our friends. But today I find myself exceptionally thankful for a fellow homesteading friend, and my neighbors.

My friend let me borrow his plucker, since he won’t be using it for a while and I have a lot of chickens I’d rather be in the freezer than the yard. Today I got through five chickens and the total time to capture, kill, and pluck all five was under an hour. And I’m not gonna lie, a third of that was spent chasing them.

Meanwhile, the Lady McFarmface had a dentists appointment and couldn’t take the baby. Oh no! Luckily, our neighbors were quite happy to watch her so I could get some work done. They have baked goods in their future.

I still have another six or so birds on my list, but now that I’ve used this plucker for an afternoon, I feel like that’s a day of work rather than a weekend or two. I may never pluck a bird by hand again! Oh. Except that goose. Oh well.

All together, that was 18 lbs 4 oz of chicken. I’m incredibly grateful for the use of the plucker. It made it far less of an ordeal. I really need to work on getting my own built.

Happy thanksgiving!

Happy thanksgiving from Huckleberry Hills! We finally get to eat the turkey that we’ve spent so much time and energy raising!

Unfortunately I had to work tonight so my family has had to relay a description to me. But that’s why we have a second turkey for this weekend! They’re telling me it’s delicious and juicy, lots of delicious fat for the gravy and the white meat is the best they’ve ever had. Can’t wait to try for myself!

Lessons learned though. We butchered the turkeys the weekend before thanksgiving. While this did mean they were as big as they were going to get, it made the entire process feel rushed. Won’t do that again. Also, we need a dedicated processing area designed from the ground up rather than slapped together as ideas occur. These birds are simply too strong for anything improvised!

But each year we keep building and keep growing so next year is going to be amazing! Happy thanksgiving!

Good dog!

As Vasi gets older, we’ve been eagerly anticipating the ending of some of her puppy behaviors. Namely, thinking chickens are squeak toys. She guards the front yard at night as an added measure to keep rats out of the coop, but we have to bring her in before the coop opens. For the last year, if a chicken hits the ground, she wants to play with it. Instantly.

However, with work keeping me late a lot recently, and daylight savings time, she’s been out there as it opens a few times recently. At first she was excited and bouncy, however she hasn’t hurt one in months. To be safe, I have still been bringing her in the moment that I realize chickens are out.

Then this morning, I was feeding the baby and watching Star Trek because that’s how I roll, when I get a text from the bedroom.

“I think I heard a chicken.”

Uh oh.

As it turned out, Vasi was standing calmly about six feet away just watching as the birds came filing out of the coop. No bouncing, no wagging, just watching. I brought the chicken food outside for them and she followed me around but still paid the birds very little attention.

Our little puppy is growing up! Sniffle! Actually this is wonderful on multiple levels! We will need some tests during daylight and for longer times, but if we can trust her around the birds then she can patrol the entire house and have a lot more room to roam. But also, we intended from day one to have at least two Anatolian shepherds, but didn’t want to have to train a new puppy while having to watch the old one like a hawk!

Also, bonded LGDs can help with training new puppies around the animals. All in all, I’m very happy with this and very proud of that dawg!

Edit: in between writing the above and actually getting ready to post it, we’ve continued letting her be around the birds every morning. In fact, I just brought her back inside. She spent the past hour with unrestricted access to the geese and turkeys, with the biggest incident being that Christmas bit her tail and she ran away. She was laying down dozing as the chickens exited the coop. I’m really excited by this!

Winter is coming…

No, I don’t watch GoT. I know myself well enough to know I’d binge watch the entire show and get nothing done. But winter IS coming, and fast!

We learned quite a few lessons from the last winter, and are applying those this time around. The animals were miserable with the incessant rain. I’ve already modified the rabbit pen to provide lots of cover, but the birds and dog still need some.

The canopy we put in the rabbit pen is pretty great for the price, so I’ll be getting two more. We also had our heating bill explode, so I’ll be getting a furnace tune up, pellets for the stove by the pallet instead of by the bag (wasn’t able to replace it with a wood stove this year), and replacing weather stripping around all the exterior doors.

I’m also considering installing some landscaping steps where the side yard slopes down to the back yard. With the birds out there, it could get really muddy.

The food and water situation is well in hand for the birds because even when it was 18 degrees Fahrenheit, it didn’t freeze inside the coop. The rabbits, I’ll need to work something out for the water.

But there’s some exciting stuff happening, too! We only had our two breeding turkeys last thanksgiving but this year we have one for the table! We will also have a goose for December.

The rabbit population got a little out of hand so my job for a couple weekends is getting them in the freezer. With the baby, it’s been tough finding time for all the farm stuff but I feel like we are already falling into a groove with that. Minus the week I was out with bronchitis, that is!

I’m very grateful for the assistance my nephew gave recently with the baby so I could get the coop door rodent proofed and a few rabbits processed.

Things are hectic, but I look at all we have accomplished in less than a year and a half living here and I know we are going to be more than just fine. We are going to be great!

Babies, babies, and more babies!

We are awash in babies here at Huckleberry Hills! On the 20th we had turklets hatch, with our miniature human coming the following morning.

Little Scarlett is doing quite well, though she’s driving both of us nuts the last two days. Apparently she has decided that she wants to eat. Not a lot, just all the time. Lol

Anyway, a few nights ago, we had a half dozen bunnies show up in a nest box. This happened literally the evening after processing three of the larger rabbits. So, guess what I’m doing this weekend!

And two nights ago, I heard the distinctive sound of cherps from the bushes along the side yard. At which point I made the declaration that Chipmunk would be returning shortly. She’d been missing for a few weeks.

I love being right about stuff like that. I count at least ten.

So, as far as babies go, we’ve got three turklets (some of them didn’t make it), ten cherps, at least six bunnies, and a mini human. That’s a lot of babies for October! Glad the mamma birds are good at keeping them warm!

It’s a musical life

Our turkeys are musically inclined. My nephew was showing me a music video and the turkeys were singing along. With reasonably good timing, too!

Also, baby wanted food and momma was cooking. I sang and played music to try to stall. Eventually ran out of super sweet songs and put on what does the fox say.

Mystery solved! The fox says “go to sleep, little baby!”