Basics of woven wire fences part 1

Well, it’s been in the works for several consecutive weekends now, but I have a fence! Normally I keep this blog pretty lighthearted and joking, and today won’t be any different! Except maybe more useful. Tutorial time!

I used redbrand 47″ field fence. It’s highly rated and probably overkill, but it’s actually an incredibly economical way to fence in a large space. 

For corners, rough terrain, gates, and (if the area is large enough) every 50 feet, I used 8 foot long 4″ pressure treated wooden posts set in concrete. 

The corners are braced. Unless you’re exceptionally concerned about strength, I wouldn’t bother cementing in the brace posts, but I did notch the vertical post to make sure it was very firmly seated. I set the base of the brace posts about a foot down against a brick. I put gravel around them for drainage before covering with soil. 

At roughly ten foot intervals (if the length of the run is 53 feet, I went roughly 10 foot 2 inches. Sue me.) the T posts went in. A post pounding cap makes this a helluva lot easier. Notice the string?

Don’t eyeball it. Use a line and level to keep those posts going in exactly where and how you want them. The T posts went on the outside of the fence, with the wooden posts on the inside. I just felt it would give the greatest strength if pushed from either side. 

To start the fence, it’s easier to unroll the fence along the line first. However, the terrain made that impractical where I was starting. All I really want to say about that experience is that there was a lot of panting, grunting, and swearing. And not even in a sexy way. Also, have someone help you if you can! Anyway, you remove the vertical wire from the edge of the fence, giving you a nice row of wires poking out. You’ll essentially tie the fence around the first pole, to itself. Don’t start your fence 1/4″ from a shed. Just saying. 

Once you’re unrolled and on the right side of the posts (easier after unrolling!) you can start pulling it into place. 

Now here’s where it gets tricky. You really ought to have a fence stretcher. I do not. But I do have random bits of lumber. So I stuck one in the fence (weave it through over one and under the next, all the way from top to bottom) and tied a rope to it. Attach that to a come along (hand cranked winch) to get the fence tight. 

Now, you don’t need it to be taut. I’d wager that’s actually probably a bad idea. But tight is good. Word of caution. As you crank it down, periodically go make sure it’s not caught on anything and the bottom wire is where you want it. The bottom wore had ridden up on my corner post and I had to uncrank the come along to get it down. I just didn’t feel like my fence should start four inches off the ground. 

If you find it’s caught a T post and that post is now being pulled towards you, do as I say and not as I do. Release tension on the come along before attempting to unhook the post. I was not injured. If I wasn’t paying attention, I could have been. 

Anywho, fence is standing up all nice and straight like, it’s where and how you want it. Awesome. You can either leave the come along there forever or you can finish the fence. Le sigh. I used some pretty heavy duty staples because overkill is better than a weak fence. Also, the barbs are sharp. Ask me how I know. Most of them are bowed out like the one pictured on the left. Use pliers to straighten them like the one on the right. They go in way easier. Giggity. 

Now, I’m no expert, but I do know that the vertical wires can slip along the horizontal, so a staple across either of those may not hold it forever. But a staple across the point where they are tied together? I’ll need a chainsaw to get that out. I’d say use a minimum of three per post. Top, bottom, and middle. 

Now the T posts I’ve done before, I just bent my own wire to tie them together. But this is a much heavier duty fence so I got clips. I highly recommend the clips. The clips are awesome. Also, you might stare at it for a minute thinking “now how is this supposed to work?”

Start by hooking the shorter end onto the wire and slipping the clip around the post. You want the wire over that bump on the post, but if it’s stubborn like this one was, you can finagle it after you’ve got the clip almost in place. You’ll see what I mean. 

But wait! That long end doesn’t quite slip onto the fence wire! But the wire is over the notch now, you’ll notice! 

But the long end is a very convenient size and shape to grab with pliers! Needle nose actually work really well here because you can grip the clip and then twist using the fence wire as a pivot point. This pulls the clip nice and tight. 

A few more twists on both ends and boom. Clip on. Please note that the ground makes this more annoying a task for the bottom wire. 

I got all the fencing for the yard done, but the last bit required supplemental lighting. I’m afraid that’s it for this weekend. Next weekend I’ll dog proof the perimeter, tidy up anything I don’t want her chewing, and build the gate. Until then, the bunnies are enjoying their new space! Pics of that when I’ve got time!

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